inflexible

inflexible 1 rigid, *stiff, tense, stark, wooden
Analogous words: hard, solid, *firm: *rigid, rigorous, strict, stringent: tough, tenacious, stout, *strong: immobile, immovable
Antonyms: flexible
Contrasted words: *elastic, resilient, supple, springy: pliable, pliant, *plastic, malleable, ductile: fluid, *liquid
2 Inflexible, inexorable, obdurate, adamant, adamantine mean not to be moved from or changed in a predetermined course or purpose. All are applicable to persons, decisions, laws, and principles; otherwise, they vary in their applications.
Inflexible usually implies firmly established principles rigidly adhered to; sometimes it connotes resolute steadfastness, sometimes slavish conformity, sometimes mere pigheadedness
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society's attitude toward drink and dishonesty was still inflexibleWharton

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a morality that is rigid and inflexible and dead— Ellis

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arbitrary and inflexible rulings of bureaucracy— Shils

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Inexorable, when applied to persons, stresses deafness to entreaty
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more fierce and more inexorable far than empty tigers or the roaring sea—Shak.

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our guide was inexorable, saying he never spared the life of a rattlesnake, and killed him— Mark Van Doren

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When applied to decisions, rules, laws, and their enforcement, it often connotes relentlessness, ruthlessness, and finality beyond question
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nature inexorably ordains that the human race shall perish of famine if it stops working— Shaw

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It is also often applied to what exists or happens of necessity or cannot be avoided or evaded
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inexorable limitations of human nature

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inexorable destiny

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you and I must see the cold inexorable necessity of saying to these inhuman, unrestrained seekers of world conquest. . . "You shall go no further"— Roosevelt

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Obdurate is applicable chiefly to persons and almost invariably implies hardness of heart or insensitiveness to such external influences as divine grace or to appeals for mercy, forgiveness, or assistance
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if when you make your prayers, God should be so obdurate as yourselves, how would it fare with your departed souls?— Shak.

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the obdurate philistine materialism of bourgeois society— Connolly

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Adamant and adamantine usually imply extraordinary strength of will or impenetrability to temptation or entreaty
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Cromwell's adamantine courage was shown on many a field of battle— Goldwin Smith

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when Eve upon the first of men the apple pressed with specious cant, O, what a thousand pities then that Adam was not Adam-antThomas Moore

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Analogous words: *rigid, strict, rigorous, stringent: intractable, refractory, headstrong, *unruly, ungovernable: implacable, relentless, unrelenting, *grim: stubborn, *obstinate, dogged, stiff-necked, mulish
Antonyms: flexible
Contrasted words: *elastic, resilient, expansive, volatile, buoyant: amenable, tractable, docile, biddable (see OBEDIENT)

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • inflexible — [ ɛ̃flɛksibl ] adj. • 1314; lat. inflexibilis 1 ♦ Rare Qu on ne peut fléchir ou ployer; qui n est pas flexible. ⇒ rigide. 2 ♦ Cour. (Personnes) Que rien ne peut fléchir ni émouvoir; qui résiste à toutes les tentatives de persuasion, à toutes les… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • inflexible — Inflexible. adj. de tout. g. Qui ne se laisse point émouvoir à compassion. Qui ne se laisse esbranler par aucune consideration. Il se dit également en mal & en bien. Inflexible aux prieres. tyran inflexible. il est rigide & inflexible. une vertu… …   Dictionnaire de l'Académie française

  • Inflexible — In*flex i*ble, a. [L. inflexiblis: cf. F. inflexible. See {In } not, and {Flexible}.] 1. Not capable of being bent; stiff; rigid; firm; unyielding. [1913 Webster] 2. Firm in will or purpose; not to be turned, changed, or altered; resolute;… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • inflexible — [in flek′sə bəl] adj. [ME < L inflexibilis: see IN 2 & FLEXIBLE] 1. that cannot be bent or curved; stiff; rigid 2. firm in mind or purpose; stubborn; unyielding; unshakable 3. that cannot be changed; fixed; unalterable [an inflexible rule]… …   English World dictionary

  • inflexible — UK US /ɪnˈfleksəbl/ adjective ► unable or unwilling to change as conditions or situations change: »He called the European Union model too bureaucratic and inflexible. »Nurses were frustrated by inflexible working arrangements …   Financial and business terms

  • inflexible — I adjective adamant, cantankerous, changeless, contumacious, decided, determined, dogged, firm, fixed, hard, hardened, headstrong, immobile, immovable, immutable, impersuadible, impersuasible, indocile, indomitable, inelastic, inexorable,… …   Law dictionary

  • inflexible — late 14c., incapable of being bent, physically rigid, also figuratively, unbending in temper or purpose, from M.Fr. inflexible and directly from L. inflexibilis, from inflexus, pp. of inflectere (see INFLECT (Cf. inflect)). In early 15c. an… …   Etymology dictionary

  • inflexible — [adj1] stubborn adamant, adamantine, determined, dogged, dyed in the wool*, firm, fixed, hard, hard and fast*, immovable, immutable, implacable, indomitable, inexorable, intractable, iron, obdurate, obstinate, relentless, resolute, rigid,… …   New thesaurus

  • inflexible — adjetivo 1. Que no se acomoda o no cede con facilidad a las circunstancias, ni a las opiniones o deseos de otras personas: Tu postura es inflexible, demasiado rígida. Antónimo: flexible …   Diccionario Salamanca de la Lengua Española

  • inflexible — is spelt ible, not able. See able, ible …   Modern English usage


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